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HARPER’S BAZAAR JAPAN, July 2017

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, Weekend Edition

 THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW: Essay on Pseudonymity by Carmela Ciuraru

Oprah magazine: June, “Titles to Pick Up Now”

VANITY FAIR: July, “Hot Type”

THE PARIS REVIEW: by Sadie Stein and Thessaly La Force

THE DAILY BEAST: “This Week’s Best Reads”

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE: review of NDP

LOS ANGELES TIMES: Review of NDP

BOSTON GLOBE: “New & Recommended Books”

LOS ANGELES TIMES: Guide to essential summer reads

THE NEW YORKER: NDP mention in “Pseudonymously Yours: The Strange Case of Benjamin Black” by Joanna Kavenna

THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR: Review of NDP

The New York Post: “Required Reading”

THE DAILY (for the iPad): review/feature

BOOKFORUM: review of NDP

USA TODAY: feature

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE – NDP included in list of “100 Best/Recommended Books of 2011”

THE NEW YORK DAILY NEWS: Guest Columnist – Editorial 7/5/2011

NEW YORK JOURNAL OF BOOKS: review of NDP

LOUISVILLE COURIER-JOURNAL: “The One Question Interview” with Carmela Ciuraru

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE: Editor’s Picks/Recommended Books

PHILADELPHIA CITY PAPER: review of NDP

THE BOSTON GLOBE: review of NDP

THE WEEK: “Six Favorite Books” by Carmela Ciuraru

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE: NDP in Holiday Gift Guide

THE DECCAN HERALD: NDP review in Bangalore, India newspaper

EL MUNDO: (Spanish-language) feature

O ESTADAO de SAO PAULO: NDP/Author feature

ALASKA DISPATCH: Review of NDP

PlumHamptons (premiere issue): feature

CHELSEA NOW: review of NDP

Publishers Weekly: Show Daily at BEA


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ONLINE:

-REFINERY 29: “15 Books Every Aspiring Novelist Should Read”

INTERVIEW with EXHIBITION A

NDP WINS DESIGN OBSERVER AWARD: TOP 50 BOOK DESIGNS Of 2011 : http://designobserver.com/50Books50Covers/2011covers.html

SALON.COM: excerpt from NDP

GUERNICA: A Magazine of Art & Politics: excerpt from NDP

CNN.COM: Interview

THE DAILY BEAST: “This Week’s Best Reads: The Daily Beast picks the best journalism from around the web”

EXHIBITION A: author Q&A

BOOKFORUM.COM: review of NDP

THE NEW YORKER: NDP mention by Jon Michaud

THE PARIS REVIEW: “Staff Picks”

THE DAILY BEAST: “Favorite Books by Pseudonymous Authors” by Carmela Ciuraru

SHELF AWARENESS: Author interview

FLAVORWIRE: Q & A with the author

BULLETT: Author interview

READER’S DIGEST: writeup and link to NYTBR essay by Carmela Ciuraru

HUFFINGTON POST: “Nine Reasons To Use a Pseudonym” by Carmela Ciuraru

BYLINER.COM: Recommended Read – “Editors’ Pick”

ARTS & LETTERS DAILY: Recommended Read – “Articles of Note”

BROOKLYN BOOK FESTIVAL: Promotional video

LOS ANGELES TIMES: Review of NDP

FOYLES UK: Review of NDP

THE PROGRESSIVE READER: feature

INREADS.com: Author Q & A

THE MAGAZINE OF YOGA: “On the Lit Mat” – Author Q&A with Corinna Barsan

BARNES & NOBLE REVIEW: “Great Writers Under Cover”

THE FORWARD: review of NDP

THE HOUSTON CHRONICLE, Author Q&A

THENERVOUSBREAKDOWN.COM: Featured Artist: “21 Questions With Carmela Ciuraru”

THE LONGEST CHAPTER: Review of NDP (also recorded for NPR’s WOSU 89.7)

POWELLS.COM: Guest blogger / Author essay (forthcoming)

BLURB IS A VERB: Author essay (forthcoming)

CONSTRUCTION: Interview and excerpt (forthcoming)

THE WEEK:  feature – “Carmela Ciuraru’s 6 Favorite Pseudonymous Books”

THE LITERARIAN: Dawn Raffel interviews Carmela Ciuraru

THE MORNING NEWS: Erik Bryan interviews Carmela Ciuraru

THE DAILY BEAST: “The Dish” by Andrew Sullivan

POETS & WRITERS: NDP trailer

PBS.org: author Q&A

BOOKSTALKER BLOG – Author Q&A

ALLISON GAUDET YARROW Blog: feature

A PERFECT COMMOTION

BOOKSTALKER blog by Julia Bartz (also here)

EVERY PERSON IN NEW YORK: Artist Jason Polan draws Roz Chast, Maira Kalman, Carmela Ciuraru, et al. at the Strand Bookstore

GUEST OF A GUEST: NDP in Hamptons calendar

THREE GUYS ONE BOOK blog: Interview with Carmela Ciuraru

LIT CHAT: guest host on Twitter

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RADIO:

-ABC Radio National – Sydney, Australia 

-BBC Glasgow

-BBC Radio 4

-CKNW Radio, Canada

-NPR – KQED Forum

-WYPL, Memphis NPR: “Book Talk”

-Public Radio Ireland (Raidió Teilifís Éireann): “Culture File”

-KUCI-FM interview, “Writers on Writing”

-NPR

-WQCS / NPR Florida

-HASH HAGS – the weekly NPR show hosted by authors JULIE KLAM, ANN LEARY AND LAURA ZIGMAN

-Bloomberg Radio Network, Tom Chenault

-Live-streaming video interview from Miami Book Fair – BookMarc

-Interview with Carolyn Burns Bass, LitChat at the Miami Book Fair

-Interview with Total Education Radio Show, at the Miami Book Fair

-“Out of Bounds” with Tish Perlman

-Extension 720, WGN Radio (Chicago)

-THE CALLIE CROSSLEY SHOW, WGBH-FM Radio (Boston) 

-WFMU – “too much information” with host Benjamen Walker

-The Focus Group Radio Show (Sirius XM OutQ, 108) 

-“Everyday People” Talk Radio (News Talk 980 WSUB and on www.wxlm.fm) 

-“Inquiry”/WICN Radio (Boston) 

-In-studio interview, the Forward podcast

-New Hampshire Public Radio 

-“Viewpoints”

-MINNESOTA PUBLIC RADIO 

-In-studio interview on the LEONARD LOPATE SHOW – WNYC 

-interview by Seán Moncrieff for Ireland’s independent station NEWSTALK –

-THE COLIN McENROE SHOW on Connecticut Public Radio – WNPR

-NPR’s “ALL THINGS CONSIDERED”: “Three Books to Satisfy Your Alter Ego”



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“Imagine this: You are on the second-to-last page of Carmela Ciuraru’s “Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms” and wishing you weren’t because this book is such great fun….  Ciuraru has chosen for herself a difficult task: telling the truth about 18 writers who, by virtue of their art and their own circumstances, are liars. To uncover the mysteries and tell the truth, she has done prodigious research: The bibliography runs to seven pages. She avoids judgment, psychologizing and tedium. She writes in a voice that is intelligent, confident and trustworthy. We do not doubt for a minute that what we are reading is as close to the truth as we’re likely to get.” –The San Francisco Chronicle

“Ciuraru has a wry sense of humor that lightly steps in at just the right moments…. In unraveling their psychoses, their fetishes and their impulses to relate the stories of each personage, both real and created, Ciuraru has created a book that is not just a reference, but one that also details the evolution of writers’ conflicts with finding their places in the world of publishing. Ciuraru builds each history as its own personal story, then builds the literary charm and genius behind the pathos, the desperate need or the business savvy for each individual case, creating a history of pseudonyms that becomes a tale of literary genius all its own.” Los Angeles Times


 

“With skilled research and palpable empathy, Ciuraru chronicles the lives of secretive storytellers–those who wished to communicate without being known…. Through well-chosen quotes, Ciuraru lets the authors speak for themselves. By sampling extensively from letters and diaries, she shows the vast gulf that can exist between an author’s identity and his or her persona on the page…. Unwilling to sugarcoat or oversimplify, Ciuraru frankly describes the use and abuse of pseudonyms throughout history…. With description that captures the imagination, Nom de Plume is what nonfiction should be – accessible, thought-provoking, and highly entertaining.” –The Christian Science Monitor


“Nom de Plume is filled with tremendous insight into the minds of these writers and their ability to create not only works of fiction within the covers of their books, but fictional lives for themselves as well. It has been beautifully researched and is deftly written—pure pleasure from cover to cover…. [I]n Ciuraru’s talented hands, these assembled brief tales of authors’ lives—that which fills the narrative of her book, as each reaches for a new name and, perhaps, a new identity to match—make for what can only truthfully be called ravishing reading. –The New York Journal of Books


“This is a book you’ll not easily put down because of its highly entertaining, colorful and engrossing biographies. Ciuraru delightfully pulls back the curtain on literary eccentrics whose complicated lives drove them to publish under pseudonyms and — with unusual biographical details that bring the writers to life on the page — divulges the effects that rippled through their careers and personal lives…. What makes Nom de Plume a stand-out from mere encyclopedic rendering is Ciuraru’s enjoyment of her material, which resonates in each biography – delightful energy spiced with Ciuraru’s wit, her amusing asides and clever presentations.” –The Longest Chapter


“Ciuraru (Solitude Poems) includes 16 writers–from George Sand to George Orwell–in her lively literati masquerade party, recounting events that led to their pen names along with intriguing peeks behind their masks…this survey of authors who sought anonymity and privacy is well researched. Amid informative, illuminating profiles, Ciuraru successfully ferrets out curious literary charades.” ―Publishers Weekly


Ciuraru’s writing is bright, lively, and smart, making Nom de Plume both informative and extremely enjoyable to read. She clearly has both deep regard for and a sense of humor about her subjects. Rather than making sweeping generalizations about pseudonyms, she enlightens us about the authors’ personalities and how and why their pen names were important to them individually.” -Jennifer Kaufman


“Ciuraru’s treatments of her subjects sparkle with rich, well-arranged detail and the sly wit of literary hindsight. With a central focus that remains urgent and appealing for 21st century readers even as it dissects the personal lives of authors long past, Nom de Plume is surely an important book — not because it breaks any new ground biographically, but because it helps place the development of authorial, social, psychological and sexual identity into a greater context. Ciuraru’s essays, the first of their kind, introduce a sense of “meta-identification” to the sources from which she’s pulled her facts; the pseudonymous artists’ personae are revealed and explained, but equally so are the public reactions, both positive and negative, that became so entwined with those mysterious personalities. Her sharp storytelling and her great eye for what was truly at work within the lives of these authors draw out a powerful message: that so much of how we decode and interpret our cultural narratives is based not on the `true’ identities of their creators, but on the perceptions of them that we, as readers, create.” -Sam Spokony